“Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore” (The Atlantic)

Judith Shulevitz offers up a (depressing) eye-opening analysis of our overbusy lives. There is another way! But community and Sabbath both require sacrifice. Whereas we once shared the same temporal rhythms—five days on, two days off, federal holidays, thank-God-it’s-Fridays—our weeks are now shaped by the unpredictable dictates of our employers. Nearly a fifth of Americans…… Continue reading “Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore” (The Atlantic)

What are the most important theological terms that every Christian should know?

Which theological terms would make your shortlist? Here’s the list of terms found in “Jargon-Busting: A Glossary of Theological Terms,” at the back of Alister E. McGrath’s excellent Christian Theology: An Introduction (25th Anniversary Edition). adoptionism aggiornamento Alexandrian School allegory Anabaptism analogy of being (analogia entis) analogy of faith (analogia fidei) anthropomorphism Antiochene School anti-Pelagian…… Continue reading What are the most important theological terms that every Christian should know?

An Outline of Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics

Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics Original Publication Dates, courtesy of PostBarthian.com. If you’re trying to grasp the contours and contents of Karl Barth’s massive Church Dogmatics, it helps to have an outline! Here’s a helpful PDF version, with subheadings included, from Princeton’s Center for Barth Studies. Barth_Outline of Church DogmaticsDownload Below is a version that I’ve…… Continue reading An Outline of Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics

Barth, Bonhoeffer, and the Bible

John Webster’s Idea Like so many others, I desperately wish that John Webster were still alive. After all, my dissertation topic owes much to his essay: “Reading the Bible: The Example of Barth and Bonhoeffer.” The essay (previously published as ‘“In the Shadow of Biblical Work:” Barth and Bonhoeffer on Reading the Bible,’and then published…… Continue reading Barth, Bonhoeffer, and the Bible

The St Andrews Encyclopaedia of Theology sounds like it will be a marvelous resource! Think the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, but for theology!